windows

Windows don’t just let the light in they help define the period & style of your home. From elaborate coloured glass & lead light designs to the more humble double hung windows tucked away on the back of your house, the right window is an integral part of a great home renovation.

 

Casement or Double Hung?

Windows for pushing out or sliding up and down?

Victorian & Edwardian

Victorian & Edwardian houses were normally fitted with double hung windows. This is the type of window that slides up & down. Both the top & bottom sash should be able to be opened allowing for greater control of air circulation.

Early Victorian houses often included arched or double arched windows but the simple rectangular style of window was also common. Typically window sizes varied from room to room to maintain a constant feeling of proportion, this was also true of Edwardian homes.

Edwardian double hung windows were much the same as Victorian but with the side & rear of house windows often included a glazing bar running down the centre of both sashes.

We carry a large range of cast iron sash weights to suit most windows.

 

Federation & Later

Although Lead light entries are a reasonably common feature of grander Victorian & Edwardian homes it is not until the Federation period that ornately patterned Lead Light windows come to the fore. These were often of the casement variety that push out along the vertical axis.

Lead Light windows were hand made by skilled craftsmen and came in a dazzling array styles. These could range from florid florals with Art Nouveau influences to a simple geometric pattern. Bay windows were popular as were the more simple groupings of 3 or 4 casement sashes in a single line.

Federation Casement sets often included Transom lights, the smaller window above the main casement. These were very often fitted with coloured moulded patterned glass. You can see some examples from our yard on the right.

Naturally Terrace House Factory stocks all these window styles please call us to confirm sizes and availability.